Experts disagree with study suggesting hysterectom


Patient safety should always come first. Individuals who are considering a tummy tuck surgery on its own or combined with another surgery, such as a hysterectomy or hernia operation, should discuss their options with a licensed, board-certified plastic surgeon.

While there are not many similarities between a hysterectomy and a tummy tuck, a gynecology study suggests the two procedures can be performed together without any major adverse effects. According to HealthDay News, researchers at Florida International University, looked at 65 women with an average age of 46 who underwent both a tummy tuck procedure and hysterectomy at the same time.

Researchers found no major side effects, but they did discover that 32 percent of the patients experienced minor complications. In particular, 10 percent had a fever, 8 percent had wound complications and 2 percent had a urinary tract infection. The findings are very preliminary, and while combining the surgery may be right for some people, doctors urge caution.

The director and chairman of the department of plastic surgery at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in NYC, disagrees with the study’s definition of a “minor” complication. He adds, “Any procedure that carries a 32 percent complication rate should be re-evaluated. I would not recommend doing these together.”

No plastic surgeons contributed to the research study even though a tummy tuck is considered a cosmetic procedure. The most significant benefits of combining the two procedures are to reduce overall recovery time as well as cost, as performing two different surgeries at once eliminates the need for multiple hospital stays and medications.

However, patient safety should always come first. Individuals who are considering a tummy tuck surgery on its own or combined with another surgery, such as a hysterectomy or hernia operation, should discuss their options with a licensed, board-certified plastic surgeon.

Tummy tucks were the third most-frequently performed surgical cosmetic procedure performed by ASAPS members last year, with more than 149,000 individuals undergoing it, according to ASAPS. It is a common surgery for women who have loose abdominal skin and fat due to genetics, weight loss or pregnancy.

Hysterectomies are the second most common surgery for women (behind childbirth) and are performed for a number of reasons. According to WebMD, the surgery is often done to treat cancer, chronic pelvic pain and endometriosis.

CopyrightAmerican Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery 

Category :   News